One night in Bangkok…

or maybe several days…

tomyung2
Real tom yung goong

 Well, I wish I was the one who did the traveling, but my nephew who has travelled so much this year, sent me these pictures of his latest food adventure. I commend him for wanting to explore the world in the quest of finding what he really wants in life. Food and travel seem to put a lot of things into perspective for a lot of people.

No fancy restaurants here, just good hearty street food.

tomyungnatgeo
Street vendor featured in National Geographic

My nephew hunted down this street vendor that was featured in the National Geographic’s food guide to the planet. You choose your ingredients and they’ll prepare it for you. *update – the name of the place or vendor is Tom Yung Banglampu*

tomyangoong
Tom yung goong

I asked him what the white clumps in the soup were and he said it might be the fat from the shrimp heads – read cholesterol! :)

omelet
Thai omelet

A thai omelet is made of crispy egg layers.

chilidipping
 

Their chili dipping sauce is er, a bit too spicy according to my nephew.

Their trip to the night market in pictures.

grilledstuff
 

Not sure what that grilled stuff above is. anybody? *update: thai sausage with chili inside…so beware*

bangkokfish
 

Bet those fish were caught only hours before, before being stuffed and thrown on the grill.

prawnsbangkok
 

Amazing sea of cooked prawns! In case you all didn’t notice, we keep the shrimp heads on outside the United States. They taste good! High in cholesterol though.

padthai
pad thai
bananacrepecondensemilk
Simple banana crepe with condensed milk
bangkokmangosteen
Mangosteen – one of my favorite fruits

Sorry I cannot add more commentary as it’s not my travel experience but these pictures make me want to go to Bangkok. Looks like when I get the chance (and the money), I’d love to make it an HK-Bangkok-Singapore-Japan trip.

I really wish our Asian (or other ethnic) restaurants in RVA will cook food more authentic to their culture instead of sweetening it up for the American palate. However, I don’t blame them. What’s the use of cooking real Thai or Vietnamese or Chinese if you’re going to be out of business in a year…or less…

But if a few established restaurant groups back up this concept and afford to take a risk, then maybe…just maybe this may spark a revolution and shake up the Richmond dining scene.

:)